Italian cuisine – Cucina Papoff http://cucinapapoff.com/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 01:16:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://cucinapapoff.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.jpg Italian cuisine – Cucina Papoff http://cucinapapoff.com/ 32 32 BizHawk: L’antica Pizzeria da Michele brings Italian cuisine to downtown Santa Barbara | Company https://cucinapapoff.com/bizhawk-lantica-pizzeria-da-michele-brings-italian-cuisine-to-downtown-santa-barbara-company/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 06:27:00 +0000 https://cucinapapoff.com/bizhawk-lantica-pizzeria-da-michele-brings-italian-cuisine-to-downtown-santa-barbara-company/ BizHawk is published weekly and includes articles of interest to the business community. Share your company’s news, including employee announcements and staff moves, by emailing news@noozhawk.com. From Hollywood to the American Riviera. Antica Pizzeria da Michele Santa Barbara opened downtown at 1031 State St. “We are thrilled to expand our footprint in Naples with the […]]]>

BizHawk is published weekly and includes articles of interest to the business community. Share your company’s news, including employee announcements and staff moves, by emailing news@noozhawk.com.

From Hollywood to the American Riviera.

Antica Pizzeria da Michele Santa Barbara opened downtown at 1031 State St.

“We are thrilled to expand our footprint in Naples with the opening of our second California location in Santa Barbara, a city we are proud to adopt as our new home,” owner Francesco Zimone said in a press release. . “Our comfortable new location also lives up to the authentic flavors diners can expect when dining in Italy, without having to leave this beautiful seaside town.”

Zimone is an Italian entrepreneur and restaurateur who opened the first American restaurant in Hollywood in 2019. The original restaurant opened in Naples in 1870.

“L’antica Santa Barbara marks the continuation of Zimone’s mission to bring authentic Italian gathering places and heartfelt hospitality to cities across the country, with a dedication to sourcing and celebrating the winemakers of Santa Barbara, locally grown produce, fresh seafood and more,” according to a statement.

“I, for one, have fallen in love with the city’s Mediterranean-style architecture and hope our Neapolitan-style restaurants will add to Santa Barbara’s already rich and diverse dining community,” Zimone said. “With the dream of continuing to share Italy’s treasured 152-year-old recipes and sense of genuine hospitality and place, we look forward to welcoming the Santa Barbara community with open arms this season.”

Dishes on the menu include gnocco fritto, which is fried pizza dough and stuffed with burrata, prosciutto and arugula.

Spaghetti nerano includes homemade spaghetti, fresh zucchini, parmigiana, pecorino and basil, and maccheroncini carbonara is made with macherroncini, guanciale, egg and pecorino, according to a press release.

The company plans to launch a gelato cart later this year.

The restaurant will be open five days a week, Tuesday through Saturday.

Opening of an oat bakery in Goleta

The Oat Bakery has opened a second location, at 231 Magnolia Ave. in Goleta.

The original location is at 5 W. Haley St. in Santa Barbara.

The company posted its opening this week on Instagram.

“We are finally ready to open our second location,” the post read. “We still have a little work to do, but it’s time to open our doors, start cooking and fill this beautiful space with all of you! »

The business will be open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday, with the same menu as downtown. The company also plans to add a few breakfast and lunch options.

“We will be testing recipes in the new year so please bear with us as the food menu will be tiny and will change weekly until we figure things out,” the post reads. “From January we will be open on Sundays and adding more food and popups. We’ll leave you!”

The Dutch Garden reopens

After a closure, Dutch Garden at 4203 State St. in Santa Barbara reopened from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday.

“We are delighted to announce the official reopening of Dutch Garden,” reads the Instagram post. “First and foremost we want to thank the Santa Barbara community for the continued outpouring of love and support as we worked to open our doors.”

The owners said the Dutch Garden is the longest independent restaurant in Santa Barbara. The restaurant, at the height of the pandemic, closed in 2020.

“The restoration took more time and resources than any of us could have expected,” the Instagram post reads. “We have every intention of preserving the rich history and original ambience of the Dutch garden that we all know, love and miss. A space where friends and family can gather over a cold beer and a meal hearty. We look forward to reuniting – forging new memories in a familiar place.”

Large opening for hives

Santa Barbara Hives will hold a grand opening for its second store from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday.

The new store, at 3328 State St., officially opened on October 22. The original store is at 516 Palm Ave. at Carpinteria.

The grand opening will include a meet and greet with local vendors, flow beehive demonstrations, solar demonstrations, a holiday giveaway raffle, photo booth and eco-friendly shopping.

“Come join the celebration and help support local bees by finding the perfect sustainable gifts for friends, family and anyone else on your list,” a press release read.

Jersey Mike’s opens

Jersey Mike’s sandwich shop opened in the Turnpike Mall at 199 S. Turnpike Road in Santa Barbara.

– Noozhawk writer Joshua Molina can be reached at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Follow Noozhawk on Twitter: @noozhawk, @NoozhawkNews and @NoozhawkBiz. Connect with Noozhawk on Facebook.

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Italian Food Week celebrates the joy of Italian cuisine | Culture – Sports https://cucinapapoff.com/italian-food-week-celebrates-the-joy-of-italian-cuisine-culture-sports/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 07:16:00 +0000 https://cucinapapoff.com/italian-food-week-celebrates-the-joy-of-italian-cuisine-culture-sports/ Italian Ambassador to Vietnam Antonio Alessandro and Chef Marco Squizzato at the launch of the Italian Food Week in Hanoi (Photo: VNA) Hanoi (VNS/VNA) – The 7th Italian Food Week in Vietnam under the theme “Conviviality, sustainability and innovation: Italian cooking ingredients for people’s health and saving the planet” is held to celebrate and share […]]]>

Italian Ambassador to Vietnam Antonio Alessandro and Chef Marco Squizzato at the launch of the Italian Food Week in Hanoi (Photo: VNA)

Hanoi (VNS/VNA) – The 7th Italian Food Week in Vietnam under the theme “Conviviality, sustainability and innovation: Italian cooking ingredients for people’s health and saving the planet” is held to celebrate and share the joy of Italian cuisine.

This year’s program took place on November 16 in many restaurants in Hanoi and Da Lat with the participation of chef Marco Squizzato of the Federazione Italiana Cuochi (Federation of Italian Chefs), who has over 20 years of experience as a chef and has won numerous international awards.

Many events will take place in Hanoi to promote the health and authenticity of Italian culinary culture and the excellence of Made in Italy agrifood.

Italian Ambassador to Vietnam Antonio Alessandro said that Italy is a strong country in the production and export of foodstuffs. In particular, the food manufacturing industry has shown a great rebound, with positive growth despite the negative impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Every year, Italy holds the “Italian Food Week” in Vietnam and many countries around the world with the desire to promote Italian dishes and products as well as the unique characteristics of Italian culture, lifestyle and people. origins, in order to preserve the health of Italians. The event also aims to promote the exchange between Italian food culture and the unique cuisine of the Vietnamese people.

Another issue shared by the Italian ambassador is the “authentic choice” warning for consumers. He said products made in Italy are the most copied brands in the world. He hoped that Vietnamese consumers would buy Italian food from authorized dealers to have authentic products produced, packaged and preserved according to Italian standards.

During the week, selected Italian restaurants in Vietnam will also present a “special menu” combining tradition, sustainability and innovation./.

ANV

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The new Trattoria Angela serves authentic Italian cuisine in northern Naples https://cucinapapoff.com/the-new-trattoria-angela-serves-authentic-italian-cuisine-in-northern-naples/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 15:34:15 +0000 https://cucinapapoff.com/the-new-trattoria-angela-serves-authentic-italian-cuisine-in-northern-naples/ Hospital transplant recipients from Italy launched a restaurant north of Naples last week to share the Italian cuisine they enjoyed growing up. Husband and wife Enrico and Angela Esposito, both born and raised in Bacoli, a small town in Naples, Italy, quietly opened Trattoria Angela on Nov. 7 next to the Paragon Theaters in The […]]]>

Hospital transplant recipients from Italy launched a restaurant north of Naples last week to share the Italian cuisine they enjoyed growing up.

Husband and wife Enrico and Angela Esposito, both born and raised in Bacoli, a small town in Naples, Italy, quietly opened Trattoria Angela on Nov. 7 next to the Paragon Theaters in The Pavilion shopping center around the corner northwest of Vanderbilt Beach Road and the United States. 41.

Their new local restaurant lights up a long-standing local dining spot that was more recently Italian restaurants Casa Nostra and Trattoria Abruzzo, but years ago was the Bohemian Schnitzel House.

Popular pasta dishes include linguine with clams and spaghetti Miseno, which includes a light cherry tomato sauce and mussels. In addition to selections of antipasti, salads and homemade pastas, the restaurant offers meat and seafood dishes such as breaded veal, grilled branzino, chicken marsala and salmon piccata.

“We also have good daily specials,” said Enrico Esposito. “The menu is not big, so we can modify it to do as much as we can.”

Until their wine and beer license is approved, the Espositos offer a free glass of wine with meals.

The restaurant has 50 seats divided between indoor and outdoor dining in a space that can accommodate more. “We want to make it comfortable for the staff and for the guests,” Esposito said. “We don’t have customers at Trattoria Angela; we have guests. It’s our home.”

Trattoria Angela, 835 Vanderbilt Beach Road, is open for dinner this month from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. From December for the season, the restaurant will be open from Monday to Saturday and closed on Sunday. Lunch service could potentially be added on Fridays and Saturdays, Esposito said.

Copyright 2022 Gulfshore Life Media, LLC All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without prior written permission.

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Malaika Arora is enjoying Italian cooking at home and we are drooling https://cucinapapoff.com/malaika-arora-is-enjoying-italian-cooking-at-home-and-we-are-drooling/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 09:28:59 +0000 https://cucinapapoff.com/malaika-arora-is-enjoying-italian-cooking-at-home-and-we-are-drooling/ From entertaining melodies to catchy tunes, we grew up watching Malaika Arora’s enviable moves on our screens! The iconic actress has hosted some of the most popular dance reality shows and has been entertaining us for ages. Although she’s known for being one of the fittest celebrities in the industry, we love her for being […]]]>

From entertaining melodies to catchy tunes, we grew up watching Malaika Arora’s enviable moves on our screens! The iconic actress has hosted some of the most popular dance reality shows and has been entertaining us for ages. Although she’s known for being one of the fittest celebrities in the industry, we love her for being the unabashed foodie that she is. Malaika Arora loves to eat and doesn’t hesitate to share what she eats on her Instagram profile. With over 16.6 million followers on Instagram, Malaika Arora keeps her fans and followers up to date with all the delicious cooking she continues to indulge in.

On her recent foodie adventure, Malaika Arora was spotted having dinner with one of her friends and the homemade meal looked delicious! Looked:

It seems that Malaika Arora enjoyed Italian cuisine for her meal! She re-shared an Instagram story to give us a glimpse of what her dining table looked like. We saw a bowl full of fresh green salad. Next to that, we can spot delicious spaghetti with bread, and finally a baked dish that looked like lasagna. The meal looked quite tempting and made us crave Italian cooking at home!

Also read: Weekend special: 5 cinnamon desserts to satisfy your sweet cravings

If you’re craving the same, then why not prepare these Italian delights at home. Click here for recipes.

If you’ve been following Malaika Arora for a while now, you’ll know she’s a big fan of home cooking! Ghar ka khana or Indian cuisine indeed has a special place in his heart. But that doesn’t mean she doesn’t like other cuisines. Last we saw her swoop down on one of the most popular street food in the country – pani puri or golgappa!

What do you think of Malaika Arora’s gourmet moment? Tell us in the comments section below!

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Experience authentic Italian cuisine as super chef Aceti takes over Sorrento, Shangri-La Eros, Delhi https://cucinapapoff.com/experience-authentic-italian-cuisine-as-super-chef-aceti-takes-over-sorrento-shangri-la-eros-delhi/ Mon, 07 Nov 2022 17:36:32 +0000 https://cucinapapoff.com/experience-authentic-italian-cuisine-as-super-chef-aceti-takes-over-sorrento-shangri-la-eros-delhi/ We welcomed Italian cuisine with open arms and embraced it as our own. Cheese pizza and pasta have become part of our regular diet, and many of us also prepare these dishes at home. But Italian cuisine goes far beyond these dishes, and here is the perfect opportunity to explore it. Chef Fabrizio Aceti, known […]]]>

We welcomed Italian cuisine with open arms and embraced it as our own. Cheese pizza and pasta have become part of our regular diet, and many of us also prepare these dishes at home. But Italian cuisine goes far beyond these dishes, and here is the perfect opportunity to explore it. Chef Fabrizio Aceti, known in the industry as Fashion Superchef, has taken over Sorrento, the hotel’s award-winning Italian restaurant from November 4-13, 2022. Chef Aceti demonstrates his innovative skills and precision technique by designing a curated tasting menu that is sure to please the most discerning palates.

Growing up in Piedmont, Northern Italy and with 25 years of experience in the F&B industry, Chef Aceti has worked in some of the most renowned restaurants and hotels in eight countries across Europe and Italy. Asia. Unprecedented in Delhi, Chef Fabrizio Aceti’s menu will take guests on a multi-sensory journey through a series of elegant dishes. Each dish will be expertly accompanied by a selection of award-winning Italian wines selected by the hotel sommelier.

Chef Fabrice Aceti

The signature collection includes marinated yellowtail fish with a fresh orange and fennel salad, pumpkin and truffle ravioli with parmesan sauce and crispy pancetta, black cod cooked with milk, potatoes earth, asparagus and almonds, pan-fried lamb loin with baby fennel and aubergine timbale with porcini mushrooms and Parmesan sauce.

We have tried all of these dishes and each one is better than the other. We discovered Italian cuisine in its most basic form and fell in love with it again.

Chef Aceti said: “My passion for good food and the constant desire to create innovative ideas with it started as far back as I can remember. All my life I have enjoyed food and enjoyed cooking. Traveling and discovering the different cuisines of the world is therefore essential to my personal journey. I realized that my true passion was to create ready-to-use food concepts for the best clients in various industries, including fashion.”

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Sorrento

Chef Fabrizio Aceti’s special menu is available for lunch and dinner at INR 5,500 plus tax per person and INR 8,500 plus tax per person accompanied by wines. You can also savor his signature dishes from the à la carte menu.

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Casa Express offers Italian cuisine | Local business news https://cucinapapoff.com/casa-express-offers-italian-cuisine-local-business-news/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://cucinapapoff.com/casa-express-offers-italian-cuisine-local-business-news/ Country the United States of AmericaUS Virgin IslandsU.S. Minor Outlying IslandsCanadaMexico, United Mexican StatesBahamas, Commonwealth ofCuba, Republic ofDominican RepublicHaiti, Republic ofJamaicaAfghanistanAlbania, People’s Socialist Republic ofAlgeria, People’s Democratic Republic ofAmerican SamoaAndorra, Principality ofAngola, Republic ofAnguillaAntarctica (the territory south of 60 degrees S)Antigua and BarbudaArgentina, Argentine RepublicArmeniaArubaAustralia, Commonwealth ofAustria, Republic ofAzerbaijan, Republic ofBahrain, Kingdom ofBangladesh, People’s Republic […]]]>

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Restaurant offering fine Italian cuisine now open in Woodland Park | Mail from Pikes Peak https://cucinapapoff.com/restaurant-offering-fine-italian-cuisine-now-open-in-woodland-park-mail-from-pikes-peak/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 03:28:22 +0000 https://cucinapapoff.com/restaurant-offering-fine-italian-cuisine-now-open-in-woodland-park-mail-from-pikes-peak/ Roberto Calcagno, along with his wife, Elizabeth, opened Mountainara Cucina Italiana, 727 Gold Hill Place South in Woodland Park, on August 19. Roberto is not new to the restaurant business. “I started making pizza when I was 7, then studied Neapolitan pizza in Naples as an adult,” he said. “My first restaurant to own was […]]]>

Roberto Calcagno, along with his wife, Elizabeth, opened Mountainara Cucina Italiana, 727 Gold Hill Place South in Woodland Park, on August 19. Roberto is not new to the restaurant business.

“I started making pizza when I was 7, then studied Neapolitan pizza in Naples as an adult,” he said. “My first restaurant to own was in the UK”

Roberto is originally from Liguria, Italy, and introduced the sources to his food in 2018 with the opening of Basil & Barley Pizzeria Napoletana at 9278 Forest Bluffs View in the Highlands in Briargate.

“I closed the pizzeria in August 2021 and moved up the hill (to Woodland Park) in January,” he said.

It was not his intention to open another restaurant.

“People kept asking me to open an authentic Italian restaurant,” he said. “And when we found this place to rent, it was the perfect place.”

Although Roberto has made excellent pizzas at Basil and Barley, he won’t be serving them at his new restaurant.

“I have a very small kitchen,” he said. “I do almost everything from scratch every day. I also make some pasta, but the space in the kitchen is limited. I get most pasta from Pappardelle in Denver.

It focuses on creating great Italian and Italian-American cuisine. His passion for perfection and the use of authentic ingredients shines through. Many come from Italy. When asked for recommendations of dishes we should try, he was quick to point out a few of his favorites.

“I grew up in Liguria and trofle al pesto comes from that region and is famous all over the world,” he said. “Gnocchi with gorgonzola was also a very popular dish.”

We enjoyed both of these dishes, especially the gnocchi ($19.90). I would put this potato pasta among the best I have tasted. They were light as a feather and bathed in a memorable creamy, lightly flavored gorgonzola sauce. The Tajarinal Tartuto ($22.20) and ravioli alla zucca ($19.90) were also amazing. How can you go wrong with black truffles (tartuto) from Piedmont? The fluffy squash ravioli was also divine.

I was particularly smitten with an eggplant parmigiana starter ($21).

“I cut thick slices of eggplant and just sauté them in olive oil until the eggplant is soft and lightly browned,” he said.

No breading on the eggplant means the lovely eggplant flavor speaks for itself. It was a delicious dish served with pasta drizzled with a savory basil and tomato sauce.

“It can be a vegetarian option if you leave out the mozzarella and parmesan,” he said.

His main entree recommendation was indeed impressive, acqua passed golden, the most expensive item on the menu at $25.50.

“I get the walleye from Wisconsin,” he said. “I poach it in sea water from Spain.”

He has jars of filtered water for human consumption shipped from Spain every month or so.

Save room for dessert; the desserts. prepared by Roberto’s father, Sandro, are unique and delicious.

There are also soups and salads on the menu. There is a fine selection of wines, mostly from Italy; Italian beers; and Italian espresso. Hours are 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Details: 719-687-8803, mountainara.com.

Contact the author: teresa.farney@gazette.com

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Partenope Ristorante will bring authentic Italian cuisine to downtown Richardson https://cucinapapoff.com/partenope-ristorante-will-bring-authentic-italian-cuisine-to-downtown-richardson/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 11:45:00 +0000 https://cucinapapoff.com/partenope-ristorante-will-bring-authentic-italian-cuisine-to-downtown-richardson/ The Italian restaurant Partenope Ristorante will open in downtown Richardson’s Central District in mid-2023. The restaurant will be located at 110 S. Greenville Ave., near the southwest corner of the intersection of Main Street and Greenville Avenue. According to a city press release, the Partenope Ristorante location will be the first new full-service, sit-down restaurant […]]]>

The Italian restaurant Partenope Ristorante will open in downtown Richardson’s Central District in mid-2023. The restaurant will be located at 110 S. Greenville Ave., near the southwest corner of the intersection of Main Street and Greenville Avenue.

According to a city press release, the Partenope Ristorante location will be the first new full-service, sit-down restaurant planned for downtown since the city’s redevelopment planning efforts and major infrastructure investments in the central district. .

“As this new restaurant announcement demonstrates, Downtown Core is growing, transforming and is well positioned to serve as the eclectic, vibrant and walkable heart of our community,” said Richardson City Manager Don Magner, in a statement. “Years of strategic vision by stakeholders and thoughtful reinvestment by the city are really starting to pay off. We are thrilled with the increased vitality of this area and what it means for our community as more and more people come here to live, work, shop, dine and play.

According to city officials, the restaurant is owned by husband and wife Dino and Megan Sannicola, who opened their first Partenope in downtown Dallas in 2019. Partenope serves Southern Italian cuisine and was awarded the Vera Pizza Napoletana certification, meaning its pizza meets the Neapolitan-style standard.

“When I moved to Dallas from Seattle in 2011, I immediately settled here in Richardson,” Sannicola said in a statement. “We are so excited to open Partenope here, bringing the comfort food and warm hospitality of Naples to our home community.”

Richardson’s new location will also include a patio, providing flexible seating options and greater connectivity to the improved streetscape, city officials say. 214-563-6222. https://partenopedallas.com

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Bantam’s Materia Ristorante serves authentic Italian cuisine https://cucinapapoff.com/bantams-materia-ristorante-serves-authentic-italian-cuisine/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 12:48:41 +0000 https://cucinapapoff.com/bantams-materia-ristorante-serves-authentic-italian-cuisine/ In a quick bend on the short stretch of road between Litchfield and Bantam stands a solid block of mansion with a sign in front. Built in rough cut stone and leaning against its own pond, the house has the permanence of geology, as if it had always been there. The mind wonders at the […]]]>

In a quick bend on the short stretch of road between Litchfield and Bantam stands a solid block of mansion with a sign in front. Built in rough cut stone and leaning against its own pond, the house has the permanence of geology, as if it had always been there. The mind wonders at the old stories contained within these sturdy walls even as you enter its newest, Materia Ristorante.

In venerable New England tradition, Materia is also an inn, with the house being as quirky as it gets, turned into a four-bedroom lodging. For Executive Chef David DiStasi, it’s been a long and winding global road that has brought him here. “When I was 14, my father and my brother Michael [who now runs the inn] started a restaurant business,” he says of his early years in Watertown. “It was never, ‘Oh, I want to be a chef,’ growing up. The food was right there, all around me, and my first restaurant job was at La Tavola in Waterbury.

The seed had been planted, however, and with some encouragement, DiStasi attended the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park. His first stop after graduation was at Eric Ripert’s famed Le Bernardin in New York City, where he learned lessons that still influence his cooking to this day. “Their style…the attention to detail always comes into play, the standards they set. Sauces, I love sauces now, and I incorporate the techniques into the Italian cuisine that I prepare.

Tagliatelle al ragú from Materia Ristorante in Bantam

Lisa Nichols for Hearst CT Media

After four years at Le Bernardin, DiStasi’s father asked if he wanted to visit any cousins ​​in Australia. “I made it a point to eat at Sepia in Sydney, and as soon as I did I knew that was where I wanted to work.”

What made him want to go to the other side of the world? “The food was so technically focused, but so clean and simple,” he says. “Martin Bern was trained in many Japanese techniques, and the more I learned, the minimalist approach, it was similar to Italian cooking. Two or three flavors, boom: done. It’s all a question of ingredients.

Not just a name — matter translates to matter, substance or, in a culinary context, ingredients – but a philosophy was born.

Unusually for Connecticut restaurateurs, DiStasi offers small-plate tasting menus, a bit of a culinary tour of its abilities. I had traveled to Bantam specifically for the tasting of five pasta dishes, the first taste. As the tasting courses are only available for the whole table, my companion and I follow the same recommendation and go deeper.

Albacore tuna appetizer from Materia Ristorante in Bantam

Albacore tuna appetizer from Materia Ristorante in Bantam

Lisa Nichols for Hearst CT Media

The first lesson is a amuse bouche of albacore crudo with fillet of gazpacho and cucumber brunoise. Dark pink, firm and flavorful, the meaty texture of Boston-caught tuna is offset by the crunch in the form of a crispy cracker made from risotto rice mousse. A drizzle of tomato gazpacho adds a more delicious umami.

Why does DiStasi offer its guests a pasta tasting with a fish and tomato dish? “It’s super fresh, a great way to start if you’re going to have lots of pasta and bold flavors. The clean and simple tuna, the burst of gazpacho…it almost wakes you up before you hit the greasy risotto.

The risotto arrives bright green and crisp in a homemade basil pesto with stracciatella cheese and extra fresh basil. Lovely texture, intensely creamy and herbaceous with the slightly acidic, almost yoghurt funk of the cheese, the dish is further enhanced with an accord of La Gioiosa prosecco amorosa. Sweet and sparkling prosecco DOC creates a refreshing counterpoint to the richness of every bite.

A one-year visa meant DiStasi had to leave or stay in Australia for another four years. With the opportunity to make every chef’s dream come true, he planned to move to Italy, landing at the Michelin-starred Trattoria Enrico Bartolini in Tuscany. The skills DiStasi picked up at the CIA, Le Bernardin and Sepia were honed in Tuscany. “I try to be a real classic Italian restaurant: do here what they do there. My inspiration comes from living in Italy, from the food I have eaten, from reading and learning about their history.”

Materia chef David DiStasi brings flavors from all over Italy to Bantam.

Materia chef David DiStasi brings flavors from all over Italy to Bantam.

Lisa Nichols for Hearst CT Media

DiStasi is quick to say that Materia is not Tuscan, Neapolitan, or Genoese cuisine. “It’s Italian food. I draw inspiration and flavors from all over Italy and make them my own.

The second lesson is an example. “It’s my way of bringing a common dish, Astice spaghetti, where the whole lobster is pan-fried with dried long pasta, tomatoes and basil. I wanted to make it more than pasta with sauce.

DiStasi’s creation is fresh homemade ravioli filled with burrata, lemon zest and herbs. Chunked claw meat is served on three plump ravioli, each stuffed with creamy cheese flavored with the sweet acidity of lemon zest, drizzled with peppery red lobster sauce. Cream, acid and heat combine perfectly al dente soft pasta and lobster in a delicious harmony.

This is paired with Bramito della Sala, a surprisingly good Umbrian chardonnay for an Italian iteration. Soft yet robust, it stands up well to lobster and toothy fresh pasta.

Putting the finishing touches on a millefoglie al pistacchio dessert at Materia Ristorante in Bantam

Putting the finishing touches on a millefoglie al pistacchio dessert at Materia Ristorante in Bantam

Lisa Nichols for Hearst CT Media

Dishes arrive at a moderate pace, each featuring a different concept, different flavor, all mouth-watering.

Next is a black swirl of linguine in squid ink, with tomatoes, garlic and hand-picked Maine crabmeat served with Aragosta Vermentino, a DOC wine from Sardinia.

Agnolotti di Genovese follows, each surprise in the form of a dumpling based on filets of Parmigiano fonduta and veal jus. This is the first course paired with a red, in this case an exceptional Terre Nere Montalcino.

Genoesea dish from Naples, surprisingly, is usually served with sauce. Agnolotti is Piedmontese, and the chef describes this as another example of why he calls Materia an all-Italian restaurant. “I put the two together – beef and onion, Naples and Piedmont – with the veal jus and the parmesan, and I can’t take it off the menu. People would revolt.

Portions of all courses are well thought out. My mate and I, even after having had five courses, are just pleasantly full. The agnolotti are a microcosm of experience. Each bite of fresh pasta is stuffed with a generous helping of stewed beef and onions. Again, the simplicity of the ingredients resulting in extraordinary flavors is a hallmark of the experience.

Later, I ask Chef DiStasi what it was like to be in Italy. “They are so passionate about food. This is our philosophy here: ‘raw materials‘, the best ingredients,’ he says.

I ask him what that means in Litchfield County, with farms and dairies on every corner. He immediately lists three on his menu: Hungry Reaper Farm in Morris, Vibrant Farm in Bantam and Desantis Farm in Watertown. Romaine lettuce, beets, carrots – the caprese salad comes from three farms combined. DiStasi says he’s never had so many compliments on a dish.

A wonderful wine from Montepulciano, Podere Castorani Cadetto is served with ribbons of tagliatelle pasta in a beef and pork stew.

A few days later, DiStasi says something that makes me shake my head vigorously, as if he can see me on the other end of the line. “The stew has been on the menu since day one,” he begins. “Probably the only dish I could eat every day and never get sick of it.” I wholeheartedly approve.

The chef swears by Parma’s “Mutti” brand tomato paste for its low acidity and fresh tomato sweetness. This is perhaps his most Tuscan dish, combining only beef, pork, carrots, celery, onion, herbs, good olive oil and red wine. Deceptively simple, it packs flavor born from great yet easily accessible ingredients, plus lots of time. Popular year round, it promises to be one of the best comfort foods in Northwest Connecticut as the year winds down and the nights get longer.

I watch some self-contained entrees make their way to other tables, and a steak catches my eye, as Tuscany is famous for its white Chianina cattle. When I ask if there is anything particularly Italian in the preparation of Bistec in Fiorentina at Materia, DiStasi’s answer is surprising: “In Florence, a steak is a sign of conviviality and sharing; nobody has a steak alone. It is cooked over open embers, served very rare, with olive oil, sea salt and wine. I have a Japanese grill in my kitchen with Japanese oak charcoal; cook it over an open flame. It’s about the experience of being together.

The last lesson is pistachio millefoglie, crispy pastry topped with peppery pistachio cream. “I love pistachios, it’s one of my favorite desserts, and a lot of people don’t really know what a real pistachio tastes like,” says DiStasi. “There’s a depth of flavor, and I wanted to show people what they actually taste like.”

He’s laughing. “That, and that’s my favorite dessert that’s in my kitchen.”

DiStasi holds dual American and Italian citizenship, but returned to his home country when the opportunity to open Materia presented itself in 2020 while he was still overseas. The other reason, he says, is that after living in New York, Sydney and Tuscany – and despite loving them – he no longer wanted to live in a city.

“There’s so much more inspiration here than looking at buildings all the time.”

We are certainly glad he did.

Materia Ristorante
637 Bantam Road, Bantam
860-567-3326, materiaristo.com, @materiaristorante on Instagram
Open for dinner from Tuesday to Sunday.
Wheelchair accessible


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Where to eat itameshi (Japanese-Italian) cuisine in New York https://cucinapapoff.com/where-to-eat-itameshi-japanese-italian-cuisine-in-new-york/ Wed, 19 Oct 2022 14:20:29 +0000 https://cucinapapoff.com/where-to-eat-itameshi-japanese-italian-cuisine-in-new-york/ This article originally appeared in The year I ate in New York, a newsletter about eating across the city, one restaurant at a time. register here. Photo: Rue Grub A running list of everywhere I’ve been, week 39: 377. Ballato d’Emilio 378. Sunset Diner 379. Kimika 380. Icca 381. Nakamura 382. The Canuck 383. Jun-Men […]]]>

Photo: Rue Grub

A running list of everywhere I’ve been, week 39: 377. Ballato d’Emilio 378. Sunset Diner 379. Kimika 380. Icca 381. Nakamura 382. The Canuck 383. Jun-Men Ramen Bar

Last week, when I saw omakase restaurant Icca posted their new “Japanese/Italian” menu on Instagram, I decided to head to Tribeca for a whimsical fusion. Although the full sushi menu is served in a different room, I was able to benefit from a zen atmosphere, minimalist decor and attentive service. The high-back seats are really comfortable, which is important when sharing two pastas and two risottos with a friend.

We started with a bottle of dry sake chosen by the chef and served in small engraved tumblers – I love the fancy glassware – which the staff topped up as often as needed. While I noticed a handful of diners ordering the abbreviated omakase menu prepared by a sushi chef at the other end of the bar, my friend and I ate spaghetti bolognese al dente (which tasted the best corned beef stew in the best possible way), followed by penne with spicy bluefin tuna stew, alongside two risottos – one stained with squid ink and the other with abalone liver. What struck us most about the rice was how each grain managed to stand out. Any Nonna would have been proud.

Noodles in Icca.
Photo: Tammie Teclemariam

At the end of our meal the chef came out and I asked if he had ever cooked in Italy. “He loves Italian food,” translated our waiter. “Its style is very Japanese – like the broth” used to cook the risotto, which we learned was made with Japanese sushi rice, not the traditional Arborio, perhaps contributing to its exceptional texture.

I first learned about Japan’s deep appreciation for Italian cuisine by watching reruns of the original iron boss. Even now, years later, the combination makes perfect sense. Both cuisines share a dedication to regional ingredients and a mutual respect for seafood, noodles and rice. Word itameshi is both Japanese for “Italian cuisine” and used to describe Japanese-Italian fusion cuisine.

I decided to explore a more creative side of itameshi at Kimika, where my seat was directly across the street from The Butcher’s Daughter. I had been optimistic, but this time the combinations seemed more forced. A starter of raw scallops with hot chili oil could have been served at any vaguely Asian restaurant, and the “fried pizzette” was more like prosciutto on a greasy scallion pancake. You could do better than the three arancini in a curry pool for $26 at any number of Japanese cafes in the area for about half the price, and an eggplant katsu entree was nothing more than a slice of panko-crusted nightshade with a dip. (However, the cocktails were really good.)

The excellent risotto of Icca.
Photo: Tammie Teclemariam

This time I had a Japanese friend with me who told me she had been meaning to try this place for a while when I invited her. We both agreed that the food didn’t seem particularly Japanese Where Italian, but maybe it was lackluster execution. The meal at Icca had been a cohesive fusion of Japanese ingredients and Italian dishes, while Kimika’s food seemed fused together. “This place is a neighborhood casualty,” my friend said, pointing to the streets of Nolita outside.

When I asked her if she had ever seen Italian-Japanese restaurants growing up in New York, she immediately mentioned Basta Pasta, which serves tobiko and spaghetti uni among other things, more downright Italian recipes like bagna cauda and tagliatelle with ragu. She recalled visiting the Flatiron site when she was a child, and I was surprised to learn that it’s not only still around, but apparently thriving. (When I tried to go on Sunday it was closed for a private event.)

Mazemen with mushrooms, uni and lots of green onions.
Photo: Tammie Teclemariam

Unfazed, I instead headed to Jun-Men, a ramen bar in Chelsea, for uni mushroom mazes. Amid the crowds of rainy night dinners, I swirled fluffy ramen noodles with chunks of porcini mushrooms, crunchy pieces of pancetta and fried shallots, scallions, and a piece of chilled uni.

I asked my server about the influence for the dish. “Carbonara, perhaps? she answered. “I know the owner was a chef at another Asian restaurant – maybe there?” Obviously, the origins of the Japanese-Italian merger were not a priority for the clientele, since I was the first person to ask. I’ll take that as proof that the dish works well – people don’t even think to question it.

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